Time for the U.S. to Reassess its Security Ties to Countries that Back the Iran Deal

By Stephen Bryen

May 1, 2018

When Benjamin Netanyahu, Israelís Prime Minister began his television address from the Israeli Defense Ministry at 5PM (Israel time), 30 April he revealed what has to be one of the most amazing intelligence coups in history.  Here he showed over 100,000 Iranian documents from its Atomic Archive, smuggled out of Iran under the noses of the Ayatollahs and the self-promoting Iranian Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps.  And what he revealed about Iranian lies was staggering: a complete record of their plan to build at least five atomic bombs, and maybe more once their centrifuges were churning out U-235 in future.  He went on to show the Iranian plan to put them on its most advanced missiles.  The Trump administration quickly confirmed the authenticity of the documents, CDís and videos now in Israelís possession.

Can you imagine liberating more than half a ton of documents and somehow driving them out of their secret hiding place and then delivering them to Israel?  How would you get into the closed Archive in the first place?  The documents and CDs, stored in man-high safes were somehow cracked open and everything removed.  How did the Israelis open highly secure safes containing Iranís most deeply held secrets?  What locksmith was able to crack the combination codes?  What kind of vehicle was used to get the materials out of the storage site?  Where did the vehicle go?  Did it drive through Iran and then through Iraq and then through Jordan and then to Israel?  Or were the documents airlifted out, and if so, how?

How did Israeli intelligence find out about the Archive in the first place, verify its location and then decide on how to liberate the storage site without the Iranians catching on?  No doubt there are so many secrets to this operation that we will never know, that all we can do is wonder in amazement and the chutzpah it took to pull off the operation in the first place. 

Now we will hear from all the pundits who will say the Israelis didnít prove anything because ďweĒ always knew that the Iranians had an atomic bomb program but ďlook, we stopped it.Ē  ďArenít we great?Ē  That sort of chatter has already started, mostly because many craven political and business leaders, especially in Europe want to keep shipping technology and products to Iran or do business deals to make money.  They think the Iranian agreement is a profit center Ėlike President of the Republic Emmanuel Macron and Her Excellency Angela Merkel.  When you strip it all away, the wallet is more important than the survival of some Jews in the Middle East.

Of course the President of the United States has to decide whether to preserve the nuclear deal with Iran or not. He knows full well that not only is it a lousy deal, but the chances are very strong that the Iranians have been cheating aplenty.  The recent caper in Syria with the North Koreans to build a Youngbin-clone nuclear reactor to manufacture plutonium and the good possibility that the Iranians have been testing their weapons in North Korea (blowing up mountains in the process) suggests that Washington also has plenty of intelligence on what is really going on.  Isnít it funny that the truth is lurking right on the surface but when no one wants to see it, they donít?  Even so, Iranís secrets are being exposed, and the secrets are not unexpected.

President Trump will soon hold talks with Kim Jong-un, the rather clever thug who heads North Korea.  Certainly the President will want Kim to stop his nuclear program; but he also needs to make it clear that Kim has to stop supplying rockets to Iran and supporting Iranís nuclear program.  The presumption is that U.S. intelligence knows what is going on in North Korea.  If not, maybe the Israelis can steal some of their documents.

Even more importantly, the President needs to cancel the Iranian nuclear deal because it is no deal at all.  And the Trump administration has to let our allies know that their support for the nuclear deal with Iran is not acceptable to the United States or for that matter to Israel, and that it is undermining global security.  The administration needs to make clear that supporting the deal now is not only wrong, but it is detrimental to the our security and to the security of the Middle East.  If our friends keep on supporting the deal, the U.S. should reassess its security relationship with those countries that continue to back Iran.